Animal

33 Endangered Animal Species of the World

The Reality of Endangered Species

As the world changes so do its inhabitants.

Animals, birds, undersea creatures and turtles all have experienced a decline in their numbers. Some of their subspecies are even about to become extinct. These endangered species might disappear from the world if things do not change soon.

In this article, you will learn about 33 of the world’s most endangered and vulnerable animals. Each one is profiled with a level of how close they are to extinction. Critically endangered means the animal is in immediate danger. Endangered means the animal is at a high risk for extinction. And vulnerable means it is close to moving to the endangered classification.

The animal profiles include a captivating picture, interesting facts and a link where you can check out more images. There is a lot to learn. So feel free to dive in!

01. Amur Leopard (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Amur Leopard is also known as the Far East Leopard, Manchurian Leopard or the Korean Leopard. It is found in a very small part of the China-Russia border called the Amur River valley. It lives in the cold, higher altitude regions.

Why the Decline?

The Amur Leopard has only about 35 individuals left in the wild. This is due to a loss of habitat with forest fires and excessive logging. This big cat is also poached for its fur, bones and as trophies. Farmers have been known to kill the Amur Leopard before it can hunt their livestock.

Stop the Drop!

Organizations are stepping in to help conserve the habitat of the Amur Leopard. Stronger laws are also being enforced to stop the illegal poaching. Farmers are being encouraged to use other methods to deter the leopard, other than shooting.

02. Black Rhino (Nearing Extinction)

Endangered Animal Species

The Black Rhino is actually not black in color, it is gray. This burly beast lives in small numbers in the sub-Saharan Africa.

The horns on the Black Rhino grow very quickly. In fact, they can grow up to 3 inches a year (8 centimeters) and reach up to 5 feet long, (1.5 meters). The male uses this super-long horn to battle attackers, while the female uses hers to defend her young. It overall is classified as one of the critically endangered species in the world.

Why the Decline?

The Black Rhino is hunted for its horn. It is sought after for use in medicine in places like China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore. In North America and the Middle East the horn is used for handles on ornamental daggers.

Stop the Drop!

With only about 3,610 Black Rhinos left in the wild, efforts are underway to help protect them. Tougher laws are being enforced on poachers and on the exporting of their horns. Also, protected areas are being established to help these great beasts to regain their numbers.

03. Cross River Gorilla (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Cross River Gorilla lives in the jungles and forests of the western and central Africa. Some are found in the Nigeria-Cameroon border around the Cross River.

This primate has black/gray fur and can grow up to 5.5 feet tall (1.7 meters) and weigh 440 pounds (200 kilograms).

Why the Decline?

This wonderful ape is on the brink of extinction due to people moving into its territory. Houses and new developments are robbing this gorilla of the land it needs for living and reproduction. The cross river gorilla is also hunted for its meat by the local villagers.

Stop the Drop!

Efforts are in place to give these gorillas more protected areas where they can flourish and re-grow their numbers. Outreach programs are also educating the people in Cross River to understand and help with the plight of this mighty beast.

04. Hawksbill Turtle (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Hawksbill Turtle is found in the shallower tropical waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It has wing-like flippers it uses to swim. Plus, its head ends in a sharp point, like a hawk’s beak.

Why the Decline?

Sea turtles grow very slowly. Because of this many do not make it to adulthood. Predators (like people) hunt Hawksbill Turtles for their meat and gorgeous shells. Also, their eggs are consumed around the world.

Turtle hatchlings are also gobbled up by seabirds as they desperately try to make their way to the sea. Once the baby is in the water, it can still fall prey to larger undersea creatures.

Stop the Drop!

Organizations are helping the Hawksbill Turtle by protecting the seas they live in. Tougher laws have also made it illegal to buy or sell the shell of this turtle.

05. Saola (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Saola is one of the world’s most endangered animals, it was first discovered in 1992. It is found in very small numbers along the northern and central Annamite mountain range.

This deer-like mammal has white spots on its dark brown face. Both the male and female have long slender horns. These horns can measure up to 20 inches long (52 centimeters).

Why the Decline?

The Saola is losing its forest home due to the construction of roadways. This animal is also hunted because of its rarity. Also, when the Saola is kept alive in captivity it usually dies within a few months.

Stop the Drop!

Although no one really knows how many Saolas exist today, actions are being put in place to help them.

The Ministry of Forestry has cancelled all logging in the Saolas’ home range. They have also put a ban on the hunting and capturing of this strange and exotic beast.

06. Humphead Wrasse (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Humphead Wrasse is found in the ocean waters of the Red Sea and the coast of east Africa to the central Pacific.

This strange looking fish is the largest of the wrasse family. It has a large hump on its head and huge lips. It can weigh up to a whopping 421 pounds (191 kilograms) and measure 7.5 feet in length (2.3 meters).

Why the Decline?

Unfortunately, the meat of this tropical fish is considered a delicacy, so the wrasse has been hunted to excess. In fact, the meat from the Humphead Wrasse can bring up to $100 for every 2.2 pounds of its flesh (1 kilogram).

Stop the Drop!

Efforts are being put in place to stop all fishing of this animal. However, this has been a difficult task. More data is needed to find out just how many Humphead Wrasse still exist today.

07. Sumatran Elephant (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Sumatran Elephant is found in the forest regions of Sumatra and Borneo. It prefers moist tropical forests with a variety of trees and plants to feed on.

This elephant can weigh up to 5 tons and measures around 20 feet in length (6 meters). The tusks on the male Sumatran Elephant are smaller than other elephants, but are still being poached for exporting.

Why the Decline?

Between the deforestation of its home and the ever present threat of poaching, this elephant’s numbers are dropping. There are only about 2,200 to 2,800 left in the wild today.

Stop the Drop!

Areas are being made in national parks to protect this animal and help it regain its population. Bans are also being strongly enforced in the illegal poaching and trading of the tucks from Sumatran (and other) elephants.

08. Black Spider Monkey (Vulnerable)

Endangered Animal Species

The Black Spider Monkey lives in undisturbed rainforests of eastern South America in northeastern Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana. It prefers to stay in the middle to upper ranges of the trees.

This primate is the largest of the spider monkey species. It has long black fur covering its long spider-like arms and legs. It also has a very long tail that is uses like another arm.

Why the Decline?

This monkey is hunted for its meat by the local Bushmen. The rainforest is also shrinking because of deforestation. Along with other species, this monkey needs a home range that is untouched by humans.

Stop the Drop!

With only about 2,000 Black Spider Monkeys left in the wild today, efforts are being put into place before it is too late. Bans have been put on the hunting of this primate. Also, work is being done to ensure the rainforests are kept intact.

09. Sei Whale (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Sei Whale (pronounced say) is found in the North Atlantic Ocean. It ranges from Iceland south to the north eastern Venezuelan coast and northwest to the Gulf of Mexico.

This big fellow measures 25 to 50 feet in length (8 to 15 meters) and weighs 40 tons (36 metric tons). It has dark gray skin and a V-shaped water spout.

Why the Decline?

The whaling industry is a tough one to stop. These sea animals, along with other whales, are being hunted for their blubber, oils and meat.

Stop the Drop!

With only about 2,200 to 2,300 individual Sei Whales left in the wild today, efforts are being enforced against the illegal hunting of this mammal.

10. Giant Panda (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Giant Panda Bear is probably the most recognized of all bear subspecies. It lives in a few mountain ranges within the central China, Sichuan, Shaanxi, and Gansu provinces.

This black and white cute animal can measure up to 6 feet long (1.8 meters) and weigh up to 250 pounds (99 kilograms). Its main diet is bamboo.

Why the Decline?

The constant deforestation of the panda’s home is causing its numbers to decline. Pandas are also hunted, but not as much as other bears. The Panda is a finicky breeder, so their numbers do not repopulate as fast.

Stop the Drop!

With only around 1,600 Panda Bears left in the wild today, organizations are working hard to help ensure their safety. Conservation areas are now protected from poaching and logging and programs are helping to teach the local residents about the panda bear.

11. Galapagos Penguin (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Galapagos Penguin is found on the Galapagos Islands, along the Equator. It is the most northerly of all the penguins.

It is black and white in color and is the smallest of the penguin species. It only measures about 20 inches in height (53 centimeters). This bird nests in cracks, crevices and caves found on the island.

Why the Decline?

When ocean waters warm up or cool down too much it affects the food this penguin depends upon. When a food shortage happens the Galapagos Penguin will not reproduce. Man-made interference like oils spills and overfishing in their feeding grounds will also kill the Galapagos Penguin.

Stop the Drop!

With only around 1,000 individuals left in the wild, protected breeding grounds for the Galapagos Penguin have been put in place. Fishing and coastal development has also been discouraged in this area.

12. Kakapo (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Kakapo Parrot can be found in New Zealand.

This endangered bird weighs up to 9 pounds (4 kilograms), which makes it the world’s heaviest parrot. Also, it is the only parrot that cannot fly.

Why the Decline?

There are only 100+ Kakapo alive in the wild. The major reason this parrot is endangered is human interference. People have introduced a variety of predators, like cats and rats that often kill the young of this parrot.

Stop the Drop!

The Kakapo Recovery Plan is working hard to protect this parrot. This organization has set up three “predator free” islands where researchers carefully monitor the Kakapo.

13. Green Sea Turtle (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Green Sea Turtle is found in the tropical and subtropical coastal waters around the world. It’s popular with people because it often lumbers up on shore to sunbathe, and also a beautiful ocean creature.

This turtle is huge and can weigh up to 700 pounds (317.5 kilograms). It has a smooth, heart-shaped shell that can measure up to 5 feet wide (1.5 meters). Like other sea turtles, the green sea turtle cannot retract its head into its shell.

Why the Decline?

This turtle is killed for its meat and eggs. Boat propellers and fishing nets cause injury and death to this species. Humans are also destroying their nesting grounds.

Stop the Drop!

Conservationists are working to protect the areas this turtle needs to live and breed in. Efforts are always underway to stop the illegal trade of turtle parts.

14. Bonobo (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Bonobo is only found in Central Africa in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It spends almost all of its time in the trees, foraging for fruit and sleeping in nests constructed in the branches.

This primate is similar to a chimp, but smaller. In fact, it is often called the Pygmy Chimp due to its slender, black furred body.

Why the Decline?

The loss of habitat is threatening this species as well as it being hunted for its bush meat. They are also hunted for their body parts that are used to make charms.

Stop the Drop!

It is estimated that only about 10,000 Bonobos are left in the wild. Efforts are in place to educate the local residents about this amazing chimp. However, the progress is slow.

15. Ivory-Billed Woodpecker (Critically Endangered)

 

The Ivory-Billed Woodpecker was once thought to be extinct. However, small numbers still do live in remote areas of Cuba and Arkansas in the U.S.

This is one of the largest woodpeckers. It can measure up to 20 inches in length (53 centimeters) and has an ivory-white colored bill. The body is black with white stripes and the male has a bright red crown.

Why the Decline?

The forest where this bird calls home is being cut down. Logging and clear-cutting takes away this bird’s ability to feed and reproduce.

Stop the Drop!

With estimates of less than 50 of these rare birds left, serious plans are being put into effect. Studies are being done to locate the primary regions of Ivory-Billed Woodpeckers, once located they will be protected from logging.

16. Black-Footed Ferret (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Black-Footed Ferret once roamed the Great Plains from Alberta in Canada to southwestern USA. Today they have been introduced to eight western states and also to Chihuahua (Mexico).

This weasel-type animal has a slender yellowish colored body with pale under parts, a dark tail tip and black feet. It measures up to 16 inches in length (41 centimeters) with another 5.9 inches in tail length (15 centimeters).

Why the Decline?

This ferret was once thought to be extinct until the discovery of them in 1981. Loss of prairie habitat and the poisoning of their main diet (prairie dogs) put this ferret in trouble.

Stop the Drop!

The last 18 black-footed ferrets were captured in the wild from 1985 to 1987. These individuals were held and bred so their numbers could be reintroduced into the wild. Today, this program has seen success with numbers increasing up to 1,200 in 18 different locations.

17. Whale Shark (Vulnerable)

Endangered Animal Species

The Whale Shark lives throughout the world’s oceans in temperate and tropical waters around the equator.

This shark measures up to 39 feet long (12 meters) and can weigh in at a whopping 27,557 pounds (12,500 kilograms). It has a flat, whale-like head and its mouth is almost as wide as its entire body!

Why the Decline?

Whale sharks are being hunted for their flesh as it is highly valued in some Asian markets. The recent increase in the demand for shark-fin soup also threatens this species.

Stop the Drop!

These sharks are being protected from poachers and are now considered an important tourist attraction in many places around the world.

18. Bornean Pygmy Elephant (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Bornean Pygmy Elephant is found in the forests of Sabah, Borneo (northeast tip of the island), Malaysia and occasionally into East Kalimantan, Indonesia.

This elephant is smaller in size than the Asian Elephant. It grows up to 8 feet (2.5 meters) and has a babyish face, large ears and a long tail.

Why the Decline?

The loss of its natural habitat is a huge threat to these gentle mammals. Elephants require a lot of room to move about and to feed, so even a small amount of land taken away from them amounts to a huge threat.

Stop the Drop!

With only about 1,500 of these elephants left in the world. Efforts are being put to work in conserving their territory and to stop all illegal poaching of this gentle animal. People are being educated on how these creatures are important to their ecosystems.

19. Loggerhead Turtle (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

Loggerhead Turtles are found throughout the world in subtropical and temperate waters. They are the most common turtle in the Mediterranean Sea and in the western North Atlantic Ocean. These turtles migrate to the United States from North Carolina throughout Florida.in order to nest.

It has a large head with powerful jaws. The shell of an adult is a reddish-brown color and is yellowish underneath.

Why the Decline?

Thousands of Loggerhead Turtles die each year in fishing nets which lead to injury or death. Their eggs are collected and consumed in many parts of the world. Also, the beaches they lay their eggs on are being more and more populated with humans.

Stop the Drop!

Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs) are being used by some commercial fishermen to stop the accidental capturing of loggerhead turtles. These allow only shrimp-size objects to enter their nets. Efforts are also being made to protect the beaches that house their nests.

20. Polar Bear (Vulnerable)

Endangered Animal Species

The Polar Bear lives in the Arctic polar region. It is considered a marine mammal because it spends most of its time on the frozen sea ice.

This bear is all white and can measure up to 10 feet long (3 meters) and weigh an astounding 1,430 pounds (648 kilograms). It feeds mostly on the Ringed Seal.

Why the Decline?

Global warming is reducing the ice that the Polar Bear depends on for hunting, breeding and travelling. Also it is often killed by people.

Stop the Drop!

There are only around 15,000 Polar Bears left in the world. Conservationists are fighting for people to recognize the impact global warming is having on them. Measures are also being put in place to lessen the contact bears have with humans.

You can even sponsor a Polar Bear, where the money will go directly into saving this creature.

21. Hector’s Dolphin (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Hector’s Dolphin is native to New Zealand and lives in the surrounding waters. It is found in small groups of 2 to 10 individuals.

This dolphin is the smallest and the rarest of them all. It has a short stocky body and does not have a pronounced beak. It measures up to 5.2 feet long (1.6 meters) and weighs around 132 pounds, (60 kilograms).

Why the Decline?

The biggest threat to this dolphin is being caught within gillnets of commercial fishermen. This along with pollution and sea vessels are keeping the Hector’s Dolphin on the endangered species list.

Stop the Drop!

With only about 7,000 of these graceful mammals left, the New Zealand Marine Mammals Act has made all deliberate hunting or killing of this dolphin illegal. Gillnetting is also not allowed within the Hector Dolphin s home range

22. South China Tiger (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The South China Tiger may or may not be in South China. This tiger was once found in a variety of locations around China. They include Jiangxi, Hunan, Fujian, and Guangdong. However, sightings are few, so no one really knows how many are actually there. According to IUCN Red List, it is classified as Critically Endangered (CR) and is one of the most endangered species.

This tiger has a lighter orange body with black stripes in different thicknesses. It can weigh up to 390 pounds (176 kilograms). It has white on its face, paws and belly.

Why the Decline?

This tiger’s numbers are plummeting because it is heavily hunted. Cubs are also hunted by predators for food. With so few numbers left in the wild, inbreeding is making this tiger genetically weak.

Stop the Drop!

Captive breeding programs have been put into place to help this tiger regain its numbers.

23. Fin Whale (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Fin Whale is found in oceans around the world; Atlantic, Pacific, Indian and Arctic Oceans. But it is rarely seen in tropical or polar seas.

This whale is gray in color with a white underside and markings on its jaw. It measures up to 78 feet long, (24 meters) and weighs an astounding 70 tons.

Why the Decline?

These whales were heavily hunted for their blubber and oils. Pollution in their ocean habitat and collision with boats can also kill these creatures.

Stop the Drop!

With only around 5,000 of these whales left in the wild, efforts are being made to protect them. As of 1985 it is illegal to hunt a Fin Whale.

24. NeNe (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Nene or Hawaiian Goose is the official bird of Hawaiian. It lives in the wild on the islands of Maui, Kauai and Hawaii.

This endangered bird has a soft call and spends most of its time on the ground, although it can fly. It measures up to 16 inches tall (41 centimeters) and weighs around 6.7 pounds (3 kilograms).

Why the Decline?

The Nene has been overhunted. The introduction of predators to the islands, like mongoose, has caused a dramatic reduction in the number of Nene.

Stop the Drop!

With only around 1,000 of these geese left in the wild, they are protected under the laws of Hawaii. Also they are being bred in captivity and released out into the wild to boost their numbers.

25. Sumatran Orangutan (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Sumatran Orangutan once roamed most of Southeast Asia. Today, this primate is only found on the northern part of Sumatra.

Orangutan means “person of the forest.” This animal has a coarse, shaggy red coat and can weigh up to 198 pounds (90 kilograms). It has really long arms that can stretch out to almost 6.5 feet (2 meters).

Why the Decline?

These Orangutans were hunted for their meat. However, today their numbers are falling due to habitat loss. Some of the babies are also being snatched for the pet trade.

Stop the Drop!

With only 7,000 Sumatran Orangutans left in the wild, this primate’s habitat is being protected and laws are being enforced about capturing and selling these animals as pets.

26. Leatherback Turtle (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Leatherback Turtle can be found in the tropic and temperate waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, as well as the Mediterranean Sea.

This turtle is the biggest of them all. It can grow up to 7 feet long (2 meters) and weigh up to 2,000 pounds (900 kilograms). The shell of this turtle is inky-blue in color, is flexible and almost rubber-like.

Why the Decline?

Pollution in the oceans, the destruction of their nesting areas and the fact that only 1 in 1000 hatchlings make it to the ocean, are all reasons this turtle is endangered.

Stop the Drop!

There are only about 2,000 Leatherback Turtles left in the seas. Areas are being designated and protected so this sea turtle can lay its eggs. Also, a ban has been put on the trading of all turtle products.

27. Snow Leopard (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Snow Leopard is found in the harsh, remote, mountainous areas of central Asia. It primarily lives in the Tibetan region of China.

This big cat has long, thick white to smoky-grey fur, with a tinge of yellow and patterned dark-grey to black spots. It can weigh up to 121 pounds (55 kilograms). Its tail is really long, measuring in at 3.2 feet long (1 meter).

Why the Decline?

These cats were heavily hunted for their fur. Today, the bones of this animal are highly sought after for Asian medicines.

Stop the Drop!

The Snow Leopard’s habitat is now protected. International bans are in place stopping the importing and exporting of its body parts.

28. Eastern Lowland Gorilla (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Eastern Lowland Gorilla has a range along the Virunga Volcano. This is by the borders of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

This gorilla is the largest of the living apes. It stands up to 5.5 feet tall (1.7 meters) and weighs about 352 pounds (160 kilograms). It has a heavy body shape and a blue-black to brownish-grey, shaggy coat.

Why the Decline?

The infants of this species of gorilla are poached, reducing the numbers in the wild. This gorilla is sometimes hunted for food. Furthermore, human encroachment brings new diseases to this great ape.

Stop the Drop!

There are around 880 of these gorillas left in the wild. This mountain gorilla is now protected in specific areas by armed guards.

29. Blue Whale (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Blue Whale is found in the open oceans from the icy waters of the extreme Southern Hemisphere to the Aleutian Islands off Alaska. It is the largest animal on the planet.

This hefty animal is blue-gray in color and measures up to 100 feet long (30 meters) and weighs 200 tons. Its tongue alone can weigh as much as an elephant and its hearts is as big as a car

Why the Decline?

The whaling industry in the 1960’s almost left this whale extinct. They were hunted for their oils and blubber.

Stop the Drop!

With between 10,000 and 25,000 blue whales left today, killing of one is strictly prohibited. However, it is taking awhile for their numbers to rebound.

30. Hawaiian Monk Seal

Endangered Animal Species

The Hawaiian Monk Seal is one of the most endangered seals today. It can be found in the warm waters around all the Hawaiian Islands. This animal gets its name from the folds of skin around its neck which resembles the hood a monk wears.

In Hawaiian their name is “Ilio holo I ka uaua” which means, “dog that runs in rough water.”

This seal can grow up to 7.5 feet long (2.3 meters) and weigh up to 450 pounds (204 kilograms). It has a silvery-gray back with a lighter underside. Because this animal spends so much time in the water, it may have patches of red or green algae growing on it.

Why the Decline?

There are only 1,100 Hawaiian Monk Seals alive in the wild. Their numbers are dwindling because of human interference, overhunting and habitat reduction.

Stop the Drop!

A lot is being done to protect this seal. Some of the actions being done are: relocation, habitat cleaning and captive breeding. Plus, efforts are being made to educate the public about the danger to this fun-loving animal.

31. Northern Sportive Lemur (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Northern Sportive Lemur is found only in the very northernmost parts of Madagascar. It lives in both the dry forest regions and wetter evergreen forests.

This little creature is gray-brown in color and is one of the smallest of its species. It measures only n inches long, (28 centimeters) and weighs about 28 ounces (800 grams). It has large, forward facing eyes and pads on each toe.

Why the Decline?

Due to more development in this area, the Northern Sportive Lemur is losing its natural home range.

Stop the Drop!

It is unsure how many of these little primates are left in the world; however, efforts are being made to help protect the forests they live in.

32. Indus River Dolphin (Critically Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The Indus River Dolphin is found only in the Indus river system of Pakistan. It is the rarest animal in the world and of all the freshwater dolphins.

This dolphin has a long beak, rounded belly, stocky body, a very small dorsal fin and large flippers. It is also called the Blind Dolphin as its eyes do not have a lens. It relies on echolocation (sound sensors) to find fish, shrimp and other prey in the muddy bottom.

Why the Decline?

This mammal’s numbers have declined due to water pollution, poaching, habitat loss and getting stranded in irrigation canals.

Stop the Drop!

Only about 1,100 of these dolphins still exist today. To help their numbers grow efforts are being made to insure their habitat stays safe and that fisheries are not catching them in their nets.

33. African Wild Dog (Endangered)

Endangered Animal Species

The African Wild Dog is found in sub-Saharan Africa. It lives on the plains, semi-desert, bushy savannah, woodlands and upland forests.

This canine is thin and muscular. It can measure up to 51 inches long (141 centimeters) and weigh around 74 pounds (34 kilograms). Its short wiry coat is blotchy with yellow, grey, black and white colored areas.

Why the Decline?

This animal is losing its habitat and is susceptible to domesticated dog diseases. The African Wild Dog is often shot by farmers (to keep it away from livestock) as well as getting caught in the snares set by hunters.

Stop the Drop!

There are only around 5,500 of these canines left. Efforts are being made to give them larger protected areas to thrive on. Farmers are also being educated on how to deal with the African Wild Dog, other than shooting it.

What You Can Help Endangered Animals

Now that we’ve looked at just some of the many endangered species that are slowly disappearing, you may want to help save them.

How can you do this?

Tell your friends and family what you have learned about these endangered species. Draw pictures, write poems or even hold a fundraiser. Big or small, the contribution you make now may make all the difference in the future.

You can also become active in organizations that fight to protect these endangered animals. Here are a few resources you can check out:

Visit each website and learn how you can get involved.

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